Review: The Rose Society by Marie Lu

January 4, 2018 Reviews 0 ★★

Review: The Rose Society by Marie LuThe Rose Society by Marie Lu
Published by G.P. Putnam's Sons BFYR on October 13, 2015
Genres: YA, YA Fantasy
Pages: 400
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought (Used Bookstore)
Goodreads
two-stars
Once upon a time, a girl had a father, a prince, a society of friends. Then they betrayed her, and she destroyed them all.

Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she flees Kenettra with her sister to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her.

But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good when her very existence depends on darkness?

Bestselling author Marie Lu delivers another heart-pounding adventure in this exhilarating sequel to The Young Elites.

(My reviews are likely going to turn out short like this more often. I have three or four ready and literally written on the backs of advent calendar pages. The only time I have now to write reviews is during my lunch break!)

But Who Does It Represent?

  • Adelina is missing an eye and starts hearing whispers/voices in her head; harmful rep on the latter
  • Plenty of brown-skinned characters like Raffaele
  • Maeve and one of the Daggers are in love but are kept apart because Maeve needs an heir and her lover refuses to be a mistress

Just like its predecessor The Young Elites, The Rose Society sucks you into its world so you can have some fun and tune out the mess that is our world. The storyline is genuinely engaging, as is Adelina’s turn to the dark side. Between everything she’s been through and the toll her illusionary powers are taking on her mind, she goes to some very dark places in what is hands-down Lu’s darkest book.

What’s less impressive are the deeply ableist stereotypes fallen back on via Adelina’s auditory hallucinations. These whispers encourage her to kill and generally be evil, playing a large part in Adelina’s journey toward villainy. This link between the voices and evil actively encourages the prejudice and discrimination those who live with auditory hallucinations have to deal with daily. That extends to mental illness as a whole as well. On an entirely difficult to understand Magiano’s attraction to Adelina in light of his characterization.

I don’t think I’m gonna bother finishing the series.

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