Posts Categorized: Diversity 2

Review: Spin the Sky by Jill MacKenzie

September 18, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★

Review: Spin the Sky by Jill MacKenzieSpin the Sky by Jill MacKenzie
Published by Sky Pony Press on November 1, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 352
Format: ARC
Source: YA Books Central
Goodreads
three-stars
Magnolia Woodson wants nothing more than to get her and her sister, Rose, out of the pitifully small, clamming-obsessed Oregon town that hates them—she just doesn’t know how. Forced to put up with the snide comments and hateful looks the townspeople throw at them, Mags thinks she’s destined to pay for the horrible, awful thing her mom did—and that she’s left her and Rose to deal with—until the day she dies.

But when a nationwide televised dance competition posts tryouts in nearby Portland, Mags’s best friend, George, says they have to go and audition. Not only have they spent the past fourteen years of their lives dancing side-by-side, dreaming of a day just like this, but also it could be Mags’s chance of a lifetime—a chance to win the grand-prize money and get her and Rose out of Summerland, a chance to do the thing she loves most with everyone watching, a chance to show the town that she’s not—and has never been—a “no-good Woodson girl,” like her mother. But will the competition prove too steep? And will Mags be able to retain her friendship with George as they go head-to-head in tryouts? Mags will have to learn that following her dreams may mean changing her life forever.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 1 (identities unclear; I think Rio is black and Magnolia is biracial?)
QUILTBAG: 0 (a few queer characters, but the book is seriously biphobic)
Disability: 1 (Mags’s mom is a drug addict but only appears in the book via flashbacks)
Intersectionality: 1 (Mags and her sister are pretty poor)

Dance remains an underappreciated art and it’s an especially difficult one to translate into writing because it’s so visual. You can list off what the character is doing as they dance or be vague to let the reader’s imagination to do the job, among other things. Does Spin the Sky nail it? Definitely! Other problems in the book, like rampant biphobia, create a major sticking point, however. Read more »

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Review: Exile by Rebecca Lim

August 17, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★★★

Review: Exile by Rebecca LimExile by Rebecca Lim
Series: Mercy #2
Published by Disney-Hyperion on April 23, 2013
Genres: YA, YA Paranormal
Pages: 288
Format: ARC
Source: Bought (Used Bookstore)
Goodreads
five-stars
Mercy is an angel in exile and is doomed to return repeatedly to Earth, taking on a new human form each time she does. Now she "wakes" as unhappy teen Lela, a girl caring for her dying mother but never herself.

As Mercy's shattered memory begins to return, she remembers Ryan, the boy she fell in love with in another life, and Luc, the angel haunting her dreams. Will Mercy risk Lela’s life to be reunited with her heart’s true desire?

An electric combination of angels, mystery and romance, Exile is the second book in the undeniably mesmerizing Mercy series.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 2 (Cecilia is Filipina and speaks in broken English; Sulaiman is a Muslim man from North Africa)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 1 (Lela’s mom has terminal cancer in, I believe, her intestines)
Intersectionality: 1 (Lela and her mom are dirt poor)

(vague description of violence against animals in the book)

Another series, another sequel I didn’t get to read until years after I read the first book. The gap between Mercy and Exile sets a new record for me: SIX YEARS! Well, I sure didn’t know the difference once I started Exile and found myself unable to put it down. Why can’t all sequels improve upon their predecessors so well and hook me as solidly as this one did?

Read more »

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Review: Without Annette by Jane B. Mason

August 11, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★½

Review: Without Annette by Jane B. MasonWithout Annette by Jane B. Mason
Published by Scholastic Press on May 31, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 336
Format: Hardcover
Source: YA Books Central
Goodreads
three-half-stars
A gorgeously written, witty, and poignant YA novel, about a girl who must forge her own path in the wake of a crumbling relationship.

Josie Little has been looking forward to moving halfway across the country to attend Brookwood Academy, a prestigious boarding school, with her girlfriend, Annette, for ages. But underneath Brookwood's picture-perfect image lies a crippling sense of elitism that begins to tear the girls apart from the moment they arrive.

While Josie struggles to navigate her new life, Annette seems to fit in perfectly. Yet that acceptance comes with more than a few strings. And consequently, Annette insists on keeping their relationship a secret.

At first, Josie agrees. But as Annette pushes her further and further away, Josie grows closer to Penn, a boy whose friendship and romantic feelings for her tangle her already-unraveling relationship. When Annette's need for approval sets her on a devastating course for self-destruction, Josie isn't sure she can save her this time -- or if Annette even wants her to try.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 4 (Annette and Josie are lesbians and so is an adult in the book)
Disability: 1 (Annette’s mom is a literal raging alcoholic)
Intersectionality: 1

Remember a while back when Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy inspired fury from readers who thought it would engage in bi erasure or lesbian erasure based on its original jacket copy? Yeah, me too, but I stayed out of it. From the sound of reviews, the book was actually very good and didn’t commit either crime in a story about a girl questioning her sexual identity. While reading Without Annette, I described it as “Ramona Blue in boarding school” and kinda regret it because that’s not the case at all. Oops? Still a good book, though.

Read more »

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Review: Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu

August 4, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★½

Review: Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer YuFour Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu
Published by Harlequin Teen on May 2, 2017
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 384
Format: ARC
Source: eARC via NetGalley
Goodreads
one-half-stars
They're more than their problems

Obsessive-compulsive teen Clarissa wants to get better, if only so her mother will stop asking her if she's okay.

Andrew wants to overcome his eating disorder so he can get back to his band and their dreams of becoming famous.

Film aficionado Ben would rather live in the movies than in reality.

Gorgeous and overly confident Mason thinks everyone is an idiot.

And Stella just doesn't want to be back for her second summer of wilderness therapy.

As the five teens get to know one another and work to overcome the various disorders that have affected their lives, they find themselves forming bonds they never thought they would, discovering new truths about themselves and actually looking forward to the future.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 2 (Clarisa is Asian, but I don’t believe her identity is clarified any further than that)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 3 (Everyone is mentally ill, but not everyone’s mental illness is written well)
Intersectionality: 2

I would have loved attending a camp for mentally ill teens like the one presented in Four Weeks, Five People when I was still a teen. Not the being-mentally-ill part, of course, but spending a couple of weeks in the wilderness learning coping mechanisms and interacting with other kids who understood what I was going through. So how in the world did a story idea I was completely open to go so wrong in Four Weeks, Five People?

Read more »

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Review: Cat Girl’s Day Off by Kimberly Pauley

July 28, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★

Review: Cat Girl’s Day Off by Kimberly PauleyCat Girl's Day Off by Kimberly Pauley
Published by Tu Books on April 1, 2012
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary, YA Paranormal
Pages: 336
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Goodreads
two-stars
Natalie Ng’s little sister is a super-genius with a chameleon-like ability to disappear. Her older sister has three Class A Talents, including being a human lie detector. Her mom has laser vision and has one of the highest IQs ever. Her dad’s Talent is so complex even the Bureau of Extra-Sensory Regulation and Management (BERM) hardly knows what to classify him as.

And Nat? She can talk to cats.

The whole talking-to-cats thing is something she tries very hard to hide, except with her best friends Oscar (a celebrity-addicted gossip hound) and Melly (a wannabe actress). When Oscar shows her a viral Internet video featuring a famous blogger being attacked by her own cat, Nat realizes what’s really going on…and it’s not funny.

(okay, yeah, a frou-frou blogger being taken down by a really angry cat named Tiddlywinks, who also happens to be dyed pink? Pretty hilarious.)

Nat and her friends are catapulted right into the middle of a celebrity kidnapping mystery that takes them through Ferris Bueller’s Chicago and on and off movie sets. Can she keep her reputation intact? Can she keep Oscar and Melly focused long enough to save the day? And, most importantly, can she keep from embarrassing herself in front of Ian?

Find out what happens when the kitty litter hits the fan.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 4 (Nat and her family are Chinese from the father’s side; her best friend Oscar is Japanese through his mom)
QUILTBAG: -1 (Oscar is gay and one of the worst Gay Best Friend stereotypes I’ve seen in a while)
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 0

Oh, were you not aware that I like cats? Understandable. I’m pretty subtle about it, what with my constant cat pics on social media and running a book blog called The YA Kitten. Of course I’m gonna read a book about a girl who can talk to cats as a superpower! Alas, Cat Girl’s Day Off is a mess. Read more »

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Review: The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash

July 14, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★★

Review: The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz TashThe Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash
Published by Simon and Schuster BFYR on June 14, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 256
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Goodreads
four-stars
Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy. Archie and Veronica. Althena and Noth.…Graham and Roxy?

Graham met his best friend, Roxy, when he moved into her neighborhood eight years ago and she asked him which Hogwarts house he’d be sorted into. Graham has been in love with her ever since.

But now they’re sixteen, still neighbors, still best friends. And Graham and Roxy share more than ever—moving on from their Harry Potter obsession to a serious love of comic books.

When Graham learns that the creator of their favorite comic, The Chronicles of Althena, is making a rare appearance at this year’s New York Comic Con, he knows he must score tickets. And the event inspires Graham to come up with the perfect plan to tell Roxy how he really feels about her. He’s got three days to woo his best friend at the coolest, kookiest con full of superheroes and supervillains. But no one at a comic book convention is who they appear to be…even Roxy. And Graham is starting to realize fictional love stories are way less complicated than real-life ones.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 4 (Roxy and her family are Iranian, Felicia is Japanese, and Casey is Jewish)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 1

I’ve been to BookExpo back when it was still BEA and I’ve been to ALA Annual, but I’ve never been to a proper geeky convention. That might change soon, but for the moment, I just have other people’s stories and the photos I always seen when SDCC and NYCC come around every year. The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love takes place at the latter and it’s one heck of a ride! Read more »

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Review: Unbecoming by Jenny Downham

May 11, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★★★

Review: Unbecoming by Jenny DownhamUnbecoming by Jenny Downham
Published by David Fickling Books on February 23, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 384
Format: Hardcover
Source: YA Books Central
Goodreads
five-stars
Three women. Three generations. Three secrets.

Katie's life is falling apart: her best friend thinks she's a freak, her mother, Caroline, controls every aspect of her life, and her estranged grandmother, Mary, appears as if out of nowhere. Mary has dementia and needs lots of care, and when Katie starts putting together Mary's life story, secrets and lies are uncovered: Mary's illegitimate baby, her zest for life and freedom and men; the way she lived her life to the full yet suffered huge sacrifices along the way. As the relationship between Mary and Caroline is explored, Katie begins to understand her own mother's behavior, and from that insight, the terrors about her sexuality, her future, and her younger brother are all put into perspective.

Funny, sad, honest, and wise, this powerful multigenerational novel from international bestseller Jenny Downham celebrates life like no book before.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 4 (Katie is a lesbian and her arc is written so, so well)
Disability: 3 (Katie’s little brother Chris has an unspecified developmental disability; Mary has Alzheimer’s)
Intersectionality: 1

Early on in my time as a book blogger, I read You Against Me and fell in love with it. The characters were vivid, the story engrossing and complicated, and I was genuinely amazed to look at my shelves and see I don’t have my own copy of it. (That will be fixed shortly.) You’d think I’d be excited for Unbecoming, but you’d be surprised. It’s unfortuantely common that I read a book by an author, love it, and then feel indifferent to or dislike the next book I read from them. Even though it’s absolutely not a betrayal for that to happen, it can sure feel like one sometimes.

Reader, Jenny Downham did not betray me. Read more »

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