Review: Exile by Rebecca Lim

August 17, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★★★

Review: Exile by Rebecca LimExile by Rebecca Lim
Series: Mercy #2
Published by Disney-Hyperion on April 23, 2013
Genres: YA, YA Paranormal
Pages: 288
Format: ARC
Source: Bought (Used Bookstore)
Goodreads
five-stars
Mercy is an angel in exile and is doomed to return repeatedly to Earth, taking on a new human form each time she does. Now she "wakes" as unhappy teen Lela, a girl caring for her dying mother but never herself.

As Mercy's shattered memory begins to return, she remembers Ryan, the boy she fell in love with in another life, and Luc, the angel haunting her dreams. Will Mercy risk Lela’s life to be reunited with her heart’s true desire?

An electric combination of angels, mystery and romance, Exile is the second book in the undeniably mesmerizing Mercy series.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 2 (Cecilia is Filipina and speaks in broken English; Sulaiman is a Muslim man from North Africa)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 1 (Lela’s mom has terminal cancer in, I believe, her intestines)
Intersectionality: 1 (Lela and her mom are dirt poor)

(vague description of violence against animals in the book)

Another series, another sequel I didn’t get to read until years after I read the first book. The gap between Mercy and Exile sets a new record for me: SIX YEARS! Well, I sure didn’t know the difference once I started Exile and found myself unable to put it down. Why can’t all sequels improve upon their predecessors so well and hook me as solidly as this one did?

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Review: Without Annette by Jane B. Mason

August 11, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★½

Review: Without Annette by Jane B. MasonWithout Annette by Jane B. Mason
Published by Scholastic Press on May 31, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 336
Format: Hardcover
Source: YA Books Central
Goodreads
three-half-stars
A gorgeously written, witty, and poignant YA novel, about a girl who must forge her own path in the wake of a crumbling relationship.

Josie Little has been looking forward to moving halfway across the country to attend Brookwood Academy, a prestigious boarding school, with her girlfriend, Annette, for ages. But underneath Brookwood's picture-perfect image lies a crippling sense of elitism that begins to tear the girls apart from the moment they arrive.

While Josie struggles to navigate her new life, Annette seems to fit in perfectly. Yet that acceptance comes with more than a few strings. And consequently, Annette insists on keeping their relationship a secret.

At first, Josie agrees. But as Annette pushes her further and further away, Josie grows closer to Penn, a boy whose friendship and romantic feelings for her tangle her already-unraveling relationship. When Annette's need for approval sets her on a devastating course for self-destruction, Josie isn't sure she can save her this time -- or if Annette even wants her to try.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 4 (Annette and Josie are lesbians and so is an adult in the book)
Disability: 1 (Annette’s mom is a literal raging alcoholic)
Intersectionality: 1

Remember a while back when Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy inspired fury from readers who thought it would engage in bi erasure or lesbian erasure based on its original jacket copy? Yeah, me too, but I stayed out of it. From the sound of reviews, the book was actually very good and didn’t commit either crime in a story about a girl questioning her sexual identity. While reading Without Annette, I described it as “Ramona Blue in boarding school” and kinda regret it because that’s not the case at all. Oops? Still a good book, though.

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Review: Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu

August 4, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★½

Review: Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer YuFour Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu
Published by Harlequin Teen on May 2, 2017
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 384
Format: ARC
Source: eARC via NetGalley
Goodreads
one-half-stars
They're more than their problems

Obsessive-compulsive teen Clarissa wants to get better, if only so her mother will stop asking her if she's okay.

Andrew wants to overcome his eating disorder so he can get back to his band and their dreams of becoming famous.

Film aficionado Ben would rather live in the movies than in reality.

Gorgeous and overly confident Mason thinks everyone is an idiot.

And Stella just doesn't want to be back for her second summer of wilderness therapy.

As the five teens get to know one another and work to overcome the various disorders that have affected their lives, they find themselves forming bonds they never thought they would, discovering new truths about themselves and actually looking forward to the future.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 2 (Clarisa is Asian, but I don’t believe her identity is clarified any further than that)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 3 (Everyone is mentally ill, but not everyone’s mental illness is written well)
Intersectionality: 2

I would have loved attending a camp for mentally ill teens like the one presented in Four Weeks, Five People when I was still a teen. Not the being-mentally-ill part, of course, but spending a couple of weeks in the wilderness learning coping mechanisms and interacting with other kids who understood what I was going through. So how in the world did a story idea I was completely open to go so wrong in Four Weeks, Five People?

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Review: The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera

August 3, 2017 Diversity 4, Reviews 1 ★★★★★

Review: The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam RiveraThe Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera
Published by Simon and Schuster BFYR on February 21, 2017
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 304
Format: ARC
Source: print ARC from Amazon Vine
Goodreads
five-stars
Pretty in Pink comes to the South Bronx in this bold and romantic coming-of-age novel about dysfunctional families, good and bad choices, and finding the courage to question everything you ever thought you wanted—from debut author Lilliam Rivera.

THINGS/PEOPLE MARGOT HATES:

Mami, for destroying my social life
Papi, for allowing Junior to become a Neanderthal
Junior, for becoming a Neanderthal
This supermarket
Everyone else

After “borrowing” her father's credit card to finance a more stylish wardrobe, Margot
Sanchez suddenly finds herself grounded. And by grounded, she means working as an indentured servant in her family’s struggling grocery store to pay off her debts.

With each order of deli meat she slices, Margot can feel her carefully cultivated prep school reputation slipping through her fingers, and she’s willing to do anything to get out of this punishment. Lie, cheat, and maybe even steal…

Margot’s invitation to the ultimate beach party is within reach and she has no intention of letting her family’s drama or Moises—the admittedly good looking but outspoken boy from the neighborhood—keep her from her goal.

Diversity: 4 – This Is Our World

Racial-Ethnic: 5 (damn near everyone in the book is Latinx)
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 2 (Margot’s brother has a drug problem)
Intersectionality: 4 (much of the book is about Margot’s experiences specifically as a Puerto Rican girl in a very sexist, patriarchal family)

Ughhhhh, do I have to review this? I’m just a white chick, you should go listen to some Latinx–especially Puerto Rican, seeing as that’s where Margot’s family is from–reviewers who will have a much more worthwhile point of view. But I kinda got review copies of The Education of Margot Sanchez twice over, so I guess it would be polite to review it instead of just sending in a bunch of links to Latinx reviewers’ posts and saying “what they said” of all of them. Anyway, good book, 10/10 (or 5/5, as the case may be).

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ARC August Sign-Up

July 31, 2017 Announcements 2

ARC August

I might have a bit of an ARC problem? Maybe? You be the judge.

The oldest ARCs are from 2010 and 2011 and they're waaaaaay at the top of the shelf.

The oldest ARCs are from 2010 and 2011 and they’re waaaaaay at the top of the shelf.

Don’t ask how many books are on my Nook, which I use exclusively for review copies. Just d o n ‘ t.

So yeah, I’m gonna do Read.Sleep.Repeat’s ARC August reading challenge. I’ll be starting my first job this month if all goes well (!!!), so I’m not sure how many books I’ll be able to read. I’m hoping for ten? That’s a decent count, especially since I get through eARCs more quickly.

I’m still picking my reads out of my dear TBR Jars, but here are a few ARCs I certainly hope I pull out of them this month:

ARC August Books copy

The Girl with the Red Balloon by Katherine Locke: I love Katie, I love her cats, and I really hope I love her book.

Before I Let Go by Marieke Nijkamp: Um, This is Where It Ends made me cry on a train on the way back from BEA 2015. Being emotionally rocked by a book is pretty damn fun.

Dear Martin by Nic Stone: From All American Boys to The Hate U Give and beyond, I’m a sucker for relevant books about the police violence black teens are currently living in fear of and fighting.

Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee: Look, the main character is asexual. I’m duty-bound to read it.

You in Five Acts by Una LaMarche: Una’s book Don’t Fail Me Now got me gooooooood.

Every Falling Star by Sungju Lee: I just really want to learn more about North Korea and the lives people like Sungju led there before they escaped.

Want by Cindy Pon: Full POC cast and a heist story? COUNT ME IN, PLEASE.

Three Sides of a Heart ed. by Natalie C. Parker: I’m a sucker for love triangles when they’re done well and I really, really, really hope at least one story leads the characters to consider an open relationship or polyamory. Teens explore that stuff just like they explore sex!

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Review: Cat Girl’s Day Off by Kimberly Pauley

July 28, 2017 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★

Review: Cat Girl’s Day Off by Kimberly PauleyCat Girl's Day Off by Kimberly Pauley
Published by Tu Books on April 1, 2012
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary, YA Paranormal
Pages: 336
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Goodreads
two-stars
Natalie Ng’s little sister is a super-genius with a chameleon-like ability to disappear. Her older sister has three Class A Talents, including being a human lie detector. Her mom has laser vision and has one of the highest IQs ever. Her dad’s Talent is so complex even the Bureau of Extra-Sensory Regulation and Management (BERM) hardly knows what to classify him as.

And Nat? She can talk to cats.

The whole talking-to-cats thing is something she tries very hard to hide, except with her best friends Oscar (a celebrity-addicted gossip hound) and Melly (a wannabe actress). When Oscar shows her a viral Internet video featuring a famous blogger being attacked by her own cat, Nat realizes what’s really going on…and it’s not funny.

(okay, yeah, a frou-frou blogger being taken down by a really angry cat named Tiddlywinks, who also happens to be dyed pink? Pretty hilarious.)

Nat and her friends are catapulted right into the middle of a celebrity kidnapping mystery that takes them through Ferris Bueller’s Chicago and on and off movie sets. Can she keep her reputation intact? Can she keep Oscar and Melly focused long enough to save the day? And, most importantly, can she keep from embarrassing herself in front of Ian?

Find out what happens when the kitty litter hits the fan.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 4 (Nat and her family are Chinese from the father’s side; her best friend Oscar is Japanese through his mom)
QUILTBAG: -1 (Oscar is gay and one of the worst Gay Best Friend stereotypes I’ve seen in a while)
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 0

Oh, were you not aware that I like cats? Understandable. I’m pretty subtle about it, what with my constant cat pics on social media and running a book blog called The YA Kitten. Of course I’m gonna read a book about a girl who can talk to cats as a superpower! Alas, Cat Girl’s Day Off is a mess. Read more »

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Review: The Assassin Game by Kirsty McKay

July 21, 2017 Reviews 0

Review: The Assassin Game by Kirsty McKayThe Assassin Game by Kirsty McKay
Published by Sourcebooks Fire on August 2, 2016
Genres: Mystery, YA, YA Thriller
Pages: 336
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
DNF
Who will be left after lights out?

Tag, you’re it…

It’s 4:00 a.m. when they come for me. I am already awake, strung out on the fear that they will come, and the fear that they won’t. When I finally hear the click of the latch on the dormitory door, I have only a second to brace myself before—

At Cate's isolated boarding school, Killer is more than a game—it’s an elite secret society. Members must avoid being “Killed” during a series of thrilling pranks, and only the Game Master knows who the “Killer” is. When Cate’s finally invited to join the Assassins’ Guild, she know it’s her ticket to finally feeling like she belongs.

But when the game becomes all too real, the school threatens to shut it down. Cate will do anything to keep playing and save the Guild. But can she find the real assassin before she’s the next target?

Since I started letting my little TBR Jar decide what I read back in early 2016, I’ve gotten hilariously, terrifyingly behind on my review copies. I feel less stressed about reading in general because it’s technically out of my hands, but that’s been replaced by the lesser stress of OH GOD, I HAVE 80+ REVIEW COPIES UNREAD AND MOST OF THEM HAVE ALREADY BEEN PUBLISHED.

The Assassin Game here? Yeah, it’s one of the victims. It was published close to a year ago and I felt so guilty for being behind on it that I actually bought a finished copy of it. If I can’t be on time with the review, I can at least give them my money, you know?

But The Assassin Game is bad. Badly written, throws around microaggressions with aplomb, and simply not fun. Read more »

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