Bookish Bingo: Fall 2016 Wrap-Up

December 1, 2016 Links and Silliness 0

FUCK, I LOVE BOOKISH BINGO. I love Bingo in general for letting me indulge my inner old lady, but Bookish Bingo as hosted by Bekka of Pretty Deadly Reviews is obviously the best kind of Bingo.

Here’s how I did for the fall. I’m quite happy with two Bingos, especially since I play Bookish Bingo very literally due to my TBR Jar-controlled reading.

autumn-bingo-13-demonosity

Standalone: If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

Backlist: The Testing by Joelle Charbonneau

Multi POV: Perfect Liars by Kimberly Reid

Killers: Vile by Benjamin S. Jeffries

Suspense: Die for You by Amy Fellner Dominy

Revenge: Interference by Kay Honeyman

Horror/Paranormal: Demonosity by Amanda Ashby

Illustrated: The Only Girl in School by Natalie Standiford

American History: Outrun the Moon by Stacey Lee

Friendship: How to Keep a Boy from Kissing You by Tara Eglington

Black Cover: Avenged by E.E. Cooper

Fall Release: A Thousand Lives by Julia Scheeres

Creepy Cover: My Sister Rosa by Justine Larbalestier

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Review: Demonosity by Amanda Ashby

November 24, 2016 Diversity 1, Reviews 0 ★★★½

Review: Demonosity by Amanda AshbyDemonosity by Amanda Ashby
Published by Speak on August 15, 2013
Genres: YA, YA Paranormal
Pages: 368
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
three-half-stars
An ancient myth + a mean girl + a reluctant warrior = a lively take on good vs. evil

The Black Rose--a powerful ancient force--has been let loose and has taken up residence in Celeste Gibson, popular girl at Cassidy Carter-Lewis' high school. Thomas Delacroix is the spirit of a fourteenth-century knight who is devoted to protecting the Black Rose, but he needs a contemporary living being to take on the challenge. That's where Cassidy comes in. She's a quirky high school junior who just wants to dress in her vintage clothes, hang out with her best friend, and take care of her father, who is recovering from surgery. She's the last person who would ever volunteer for such a task, but no one actually asked her.  Now, like it or not, she finds herself training before dawn and battling demons at parties, the mall, and even at school. But hey, no one ever said high school was going to be easy. . .

Diversity Rating: 1 – Tokenism

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 2 (Cassidy’s best friend Nash is asexual and defies most stereotypes about ace people)
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 0

YA paranormal novels–specifically Ellen Schreiber’s Vampire Kisses series–are what made me a reader, so I’ll always have a soft spot for the genre. Sadly, the YA paranormal market dried up with the majority of Twilight mania. Such is the nature of fads. BUT LO, A MIRACLE: I got pointed to a YA book that was paranormal and had a major character who outright declared his asexuality. As your local aro ace, it was my duty to read Demonosity and enjoy the story of a teenage girl who gets suckered into chopping up demonic knights thanks to a temporary tattoo. (I think?) Read more »

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Review: Bad Boy by Elliot Wake

November 21, 2016 Diversity 5 0 ★★★★

Review: Bad Boy by Elliot WakeBad Boy by Elliot Wake
Published by Atria Books on December 6, 2016
Genres: NA Thriller
Pages: 256
Format: eARC
Source: eARC via Edelweiss
Goodreads
four-stars
Vlog star Renard Grant has nothing to prove: he’s got a pretty face, chiseled body, and two million adoring video subscribers. Plus the scars on his chest and a prescription for testosterone. Because Ren is transgender: assigned female at birth, living now as male. He films his transition and shares it bravely with the world; his fans love his honesty and positivity.

But Ren has been living a double life.

Off-camera, he’s Cane, the muscle-bound enforcer for social justice vigilante group Black Iris. As Cane, he lets his dark side loose. Hurts those who prey on the disempowered. Indulges in the ugly side of masculinity. And his new partner, Tamsin Baylor, is a girl as rough and relentless as him. Together, they terrorize the trolls into silence.

But when a routine Black Iris job goes south, Ren is put in the crosshairs. Someone is out to ruin his life. He’s a bad boy, they say, guilty of what he punishes others for.

Just like every other guy: at heart, he’s a monster, too.

Now Ren’s got everything to prove. He has to clear his name, and show the world he’s a good man. But that requires facing demons he’s locked away for years. And it might mean discovering he’s not such a good guy after all.

Diversity Rating: 5 – Diverse as Fuck

Racial-Ethnic: 3 (Tamsin is dark-skinned, though I can’t recall much else)
QUILTBAG: 5 (you’re honestly hard-pressed to find a het person in the novel)
Disability: 4 (Ren is depressed, Blythe is bipolar, and there’s a lot more than that)
Intersectionality: 5 (Wake’s characters are brimming with intersections of identity)

God help you if you try to read Bad Boy before Wake’s previous novels Black Iris and Cam Girl because it’s gonna spoil you hardcore on events and twists from those novels. I’m putting that first because I decided not to heed Wake’s warning and I regret it somewhat. The excellency found within Bad Boy‘s pages ensures I’ll go back to read the previous novels anyway! Read more »

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Review: The Only Girl in School by Natalie Standiford

November 18, 2016 Diversity 0, Reviews 0 ★★

Review: The Only Girl in School by Natalie StandifordThe Only Girl in School by Natalie Standiford
on January 26, 2016
Genres: MG Contemporary
Pages: 256
Format: Hardcover
Source: finished copy from the publisher
Goodreads
two-stars
When Claire’s best friend, Bess, moves away, she becomes the only girl left in her entire school. At first, she thinks she’ll be able to deal with this -- after all, the girls’ bathroom is now completely hers, so she can turn it into her own private headquarters and draw on the walls. When it comes to soccer games or sailing races, she can face off against any boy.

The problem is that her other best friend, Henry, has begun to ignore her. And Webby, a super-annoying bully, won’t leave her alone. And Yucky Gilbert, the boy who has a crush on her, also won’t leave her alone.

It’s never easy being the only one -- and over the course of a wacky school year, Claire is going to have to make it through challenges big and small.  The boys may think they rule the school, but when it comes to thinking on your feet, Claire’s got them outnumbered.

Diversity Rating: 0 – What Diversity?

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 0

Reading has always been a solitary activity for me. As a little girl, my parents never read a book before I did to make sure it was safe for me, nor did they ever read it with me so I could discuss questionable stuff with them. Even when I was in elementary school and my fifth grade class read the entirety of Holes by Louis Sachar out loud with new students playing different roles from the book each day, I read ahead on my own. Well, The Only Girl in School is one of the very few books I’d ever think needs to be read by parent and child together. It’s important no matter the child’s gender. Read more »

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Review: Summer of Sloane by Erin L. Schneider

November 17, 2016 Diversity 2, Reviews 0 ★★★½

Review: Summer of Sloane by Erin L. SchneiderSummer of Sloane by Erin L. Schneider
on May 3, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 304
Format: Hardcover
Source: ALA Annual 2016
Goodreads
three-half-stars
Warm Hawaiian sun. Lazy beach days. Flirty texts with her boyfriend back in Seattle.

These are the things seventeen-year-old Sloane McIntyre pictured when she imagined the summer she’d be spending at her mom’s home in Hawaii with her twin brother, Penn. Instead, after learning an unthinkable secret about her boyfriend, Tyler, and best friend, Mick, all she has is a fractured hand and a completely shattered heart.

Once she arrives in Honolulu, though, Sloane hopes that Hawaii might just be the escape she needs. With beach bonfires, old friends, exotic food, and the wonders of a waterproof cast, there’s no reason Sloane shouldn’t enjoy her summer. And when she meets Finn McAllister, the handsome son of a hotel magnate who doesn’t always play by the rules, she knows he’s the perfect distraction from everything that’s so wrong back home.

But it turns out a measly ocean isn’t nearly enough to stop all the emails, texts, and voicemails from her ex-boyfriend and ex-best friend, desperate to explain away their betrayal. And as her casual connection with Finn grows deeper, Sloane’s carefree summer might not be as easy to find as she’d hoped. Weighing years of history with Mick and Tyler against their deception, and the delicate possibility of new love, Sloane must decide when to forgive, and when to live for herself.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 4 (Sloane and her brother are Native Hawaiian through their mom)
QUILTBAG: 1 (one supporting character is a lesbian)
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: 2 (Maile, Sloane’s co-worker, is a lesbian and presumably Native Hawaiian based on her name)

If you’ve ever been to Hawaii, you probably have very vivid memories of it. I only went once when I was eleven and my dad won a trip there, but I still remember everything from the trip clearly. That includes my raging carsickness while we drove up a dormant volcano and the absolute monsoon that my family got drenched in at the top of said volcano. Summer of Sloane surfed onto my radar because of its Hawaiian setting and I’m glad it stayed around. Infidelity is everywhere and the characters are the best kinds of messy.

Read more »

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Review: Die for You by Amy Fellner Dominy

November 14, 2016 Diversity 1, Reviews 0 ★★★★

Review: Die for You by Amy Fellner DominyDie for You by Amy Fellner Dominy
Published by Delacorte Press on November 8, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 304
Format: ARC
Source: ALA Annual 2016
Goodreads
four-stars
Not everything is as perfect as it seems in this dark romance by A Matter of Heart author, Amy Dominy.

Theirs was the perfect love story.

After Emma Lorde’s parents’ divorce forces her to move halfway across the state of Arizona to live with her father, Emma must face her senior year in a new school knowing absolutely no one.

Then she meets Dillon Hobbs and something just clicks.

Dillon introduces Emma to friends she can call her own. He provides a refuge from the chaos of her past and the security of a commitment that he promises will last forever. And because circumstances of her messy life forced Emma to put aside her dream of pursuing archaeology, Dillon creates a blueprint for a future together.
He saves her, over and over, by loving her more than she thought anyone ever would.

But just when everything seems picture-perfect, Emma is offered an opportunity that will upend the future they’ve planned. Uncertainty grows, and fear spirals into something darker.

Now Dillon is the one who needs saving.

But how much do you sacrifice for the one you love? What if saving Dillon means losing herself?

Diversity Rating: 1 – Tokenism

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 0
Disability: 1 (Dillon has mental issues the author says are purposefully left unspecified)
Intersectionality: 0

Well. After the clusterfuck that was last week, let’s get back to business. Read more »

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Review: My Sister Rosa by Justine Larbalestier

November 4, 2016 Diversity 5, Reviews 1 ★★★★½

my-sister-rosaMy Sister Rosa by Justine Larbalestier
Published by Soho Teen on November 15, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary, YA Thriller
Pages: 320
Format: ARC
Source: print ARC from Amazon Vine
Goodreads
four-half-stars
What if the most terrifying person you know is your ten-year-old sister?

Seventeen-year-old Aussie Che Taylor loves his younger sister, Rosa. But he’s also certain that she’s a diagnosable psychopath—clinically, threateningly, dangerously. Recently Rosa has been making trouble, hurting things. Che is the only one who knows; he’s the only one his sister trusts. Rosa is smart, talented, pretty, and very good at hiding what she is and the violence she’s capable of.

Their parents, whose business takes the family from place to place, brush off the warning signs as Rosa’s “acting out.” Now that they have moved again—from Bangkok to New York City—their new hometown provides far too many opportunities for Rosa to play her increasingly complex and disturbing games. Alone, Che must balance his desire to protect Rosa from the world with the desperate need to protect the world from her.

Diversity Rating: 5 – Diverse as Fuck

It’s been so long since I read the novel that I can’t recall everything well enough for a proper explanation, but it includes Korean-American sisters, one of whom is a lesbian; a character named Elon whose pronouns are just Elon, putting the character somewhere in the ballpark of agender; a black love interest with lesbian mothers; Che’s ethnic Jewish identity through his paternal family; and serious consideration of whether Rosa’s condition is a mental illness or disability in itself due to her exhibiting symptoms once she hit toddlerhood. It’s earned the 5 rating.

Children creep me out on a good day, so it goes without saying that a tiny, sociopathic child like Rosa would terrify me. Honestly, Larbalestier’s latest wasn’t even on my radar at first! My buddy Lili recommended the book to me and I just happened to have access to it, so I dove right in. Wow. In a nutshell, My Sister Rosa is fucked up and impossible to put down. Read more »

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