Author: Kristin Elizabeth Clark

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Review: Jess, Chunk, and the Road Trip to Infinity by Kristin Elizabeth Clark

September 8, 2017 Diversity 3, Reviews 0 ★★½

Review: Jess, Chunk, and the Road Trip to Infinity by Kristin Elizabeth ClarkJess, Chunk, and the Road Trip to Infinity by Kristin Elizabeth Clark
Published by Farrar Straus & Giroux on November 8, 2016
Genres: YA, YA Contemporary
Pages: 272
Format: ARC
Source: print ARC from the publisher
Goodreads
two-half-stars
The last time Jess saw her father, she was a boy named Jeremy. Now she’s a high school graduate, soon to be on her way to art school. But first, Jess has some unfinished business with her dad. So she’s driving halfway across the country to his wedding. He happens to be marrying her mom’s ex-best friend. It’s not like Jess wasn’t invited; she was. She just told them she wasn’t coming. Surprise!

Luckily, Jess isn’t making this trip alone. Her best friend, Christophe—nicknamed Chunk—is joining her. Chunk has always been there for Jess, and he’s been especially supportive of her transition, which has recently been jump-started with hormone therapy.

Along the way from California to Chicago, Jess and Chunk will visit roadside attractions, make a new friend or two, and learn a few things about themselves—and each other—that call their true feelings about their relationship into question.

Diversity Rating: 2 – It’s a Start!

Racial-Ethnic: 0
QUILTBAG: 4 (Jess is a trans girl, Chuck is pansexual)
Disability: 0
Intersectionality: -3 (the book is heinously fatphobic in how it describes Chuck and it takes the entire book for Jess to learn better)

Though it was troubling at times and my feelings might change upon rereading it, I enjoyed Clark’s debut novel Freakboy. Where Freakboy was serious and at times scary due to violence against two of its narrators, Jess, Chunk, and the Road Trip to Infinity is more lighthearted and features no violence against Jess whatsoever, though two instances of violence against other QUILTBAG individuals are mentioned. Its trans rep shines, but the rest of the book leaves something to be desired. Read more »

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